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Hypothetical scenarios developed at the workshop

Workshop participants were divided into groups and they developed scenarios to work on. The scenarios were based on the experiences of those involved.

Responding to problems with group alcohol abuse

The problem

The problem addressed by this group concerned the excessive consumption of alcohol accompanied by the formation of large, loosely structured groups that engaged in antisocial behaviour and clashes with police.

The strategy

The group recognised the need to minimise incidents of violence and increase public safety. They saw the development of an 'early warning' capacity as an important component of their response, using intelligence to identify where and when problems might occur. They saw involving the community and other agencies as crucial, with the engagement of responsible community members and agencies such as the Department of Health in any interventions.

One of the key components of the group's strategy was to reduce alcohol consumption. One way to achieve this was the implementation of a binge drinking awareness campaign to make community members aware of the health and social costs of excessive alcohol use and risky drinking behaviours. Another possibility put forward was a system to promote and reward alcohol-free homes (i.e. where all the members of the household refrained from alcohol use). Engaging the media and generating media interest and support were put forward as avenues for increasing public awareness and education around alcohol use.

The group considered that targeting the availability of alcohol on credit might be one way of reducing the supply of alcohol to problem drinkers. They also suggested there might be ways of using victims in receipt of crime compensation to assist those affected by the antisocial behaviours of drinkers, but noted that this would need further consideration.

Objectives

Six month objectives:

  • fewer incidents of excessive alcohol consumption
  • a reduction in violence and antisocial behaviour
  • elimination of the need for an escalated police response
  • improved health outcomes for those affected by alcohol use.

Twelve month objectives:

  • improved relationships between police and the Aboriginal community, particularly young people
  • improved health and social outcomes for the community.

Drug use by Indigenous youth

The problem

The problem identified by this group concerned the use of illicit drugs by Indigenous youth.

The strategy

The group saw core police operations as the primary response to this problem, through enforcement of illicit drug-related laws and the disruption of suppliers. They saw the role of police as to first and foremost maintain the rule of law, using established police procedures, strategies and intelligence to minimise drug use through supply reduction and arrest of offenders.

At the same time, the group saw the education of drugs users as very important. Strategies centred around using the ACLO, Community Liaison Officer (CLO) and Youth Liaison Officer (YLO) to engage with education authorities to provide education to youth through schools, the PCYC and youth groups.

Another strategy proposed by the group was the diversion of users away from drug use and antisocial behaviour. The group proposed engaging with external agencies to identify diversion programs and activities and to establish referral networks through which young people could gain access to such programs.

Objectives

Six month objectives:

  • reduction in drug-related crime
  • reduction in drug use by Indigenous youth.

Twelve month objectives:

  • ongoing reduction in crime
  • positive development of youth through engagement in prosocial activities.

Illegal and antisocial behaviour in identified premises

The problem

The problem addressed by this group concerned a problem premises in a particular area which was attracting illegal and antisocial behaviour.

The strategy

The group saw the primary objective as elimination of the criminal behaviour occurring in and around the premises, adopting a zero tolerance and highly visible policing approach. A major element of the suggested response to this behaviour was the gathering of intelligence to define the criminal problems occurring and the instigators and contributors to these offences. The targeting of criminal behaviour would positively influence community perceptions and reduce the fear of crime in the area.

The group saw engagement with the community, particularly the Indigenous community, as an important element in their strategic response. They suggested establishing a community focus group, with the ACLO as a primary member of the group. This group would help facilitate an interagency approach, with agreements set up to shape and inform the involvement of each agency. They saw capacity building within the Indigenous community as important to maintaining crime reduction and prevention efforts.

As a way of giving those involved in the problem behaviour a more positive outlet and focus for their activities, the group proposed establishing a community centre that would act as a gathering point. They also suggested a community safety audit, informed through door-knocking and direct engagement with the community, as a way to address perceptions and fear of crime.

The group emphasised the importance of being proactive in their engagement with the community and building support within the community to promote positive behaviours and crime prevention. One strategy proposed to achieve this was the delivery of workshops through which community representatives could work together on developing proactive solutions.

Objectives

Six month objectives:

  • completion of intelligence gathering and analysis
  • establishment of the community focus group
  • development of an action plan by the community focus group
  • assess results of high visibility policing and zero tolerance approaches and enforcement activities.

Twelve month objectives:

  • receive funding for establishment of the community centre
  • a measurable reduction in crime
  • reduction in the perceptions of crime and fear of crime in the community
  • awareness in the community of the services available to help offenders and those at risk
  • continued communication with all agencies involved
  • evaluation of the police and community response to the problem.

Cultural identification of Koori youth

The problem

The problem addressed by this group concerned Koori youth not identifying and engaging with their culture and background.

The strategy

The group saw it as important that Koori youth were able to identify with their culture and strengthen their cultural identity as this would build resilience and capacity in the young people and reduce their involvement with the criminal justice system. They saw education, awareness, information provision and mentoring as the keys to developing cultural identification.

The group saw the best strategic approach to cultural development as very much lying in engagement with the community. They proposed identifying police and community members who could work together with the ACLO on building programs and services. The group saw it as critical to engage with families and the community to create plans based on a community code of conduct which would incorporate respect for country, property, other people and self.

The strategic approach put forward by the group emphasised the need to develop a solid capacity and grounding for building these programs and services. They identified the need to locate sources of funding and to begin engaging with funding agencies early on. Identifying or establishing Koori youth education officers was also an important practical step in the strategy.

Identifying the Koori youth who were at risk or would benefit from the program was another vital part of the strategy, with this identification taking place through consultation with school welfare coordinators. The group suggested targeting the program at those aged 10 to 11 years as this would be the optimal time for them to benefit and at which to intervene before any problem behaviours developed.

The group suggested a number of ways through which cultural identification and engagement could be enhanced. They suggested a range of activities, such as attendance at the Trust League and teaching young people about significant cultural sites in the local area.

Objectives

Six month objectives:

  • funding sources identified and funding arrangements in place
  • a process developed and implemented to identify young people at risk
  • creating an engagement process for families and the community
  • contact with Koori community organisations
  • establishment of agreements with Koori community organisations and other agencies in the form of MOUs
  • developing a measuring and evaluation process, with review of progress every three months.

Twelve month objectives:

  • the number of at risk young people identified, engaged, measured and reportable
  • the number of young people participating in program, and whether they have engaged and stayed engaged with the program and services, measured and reportable
  • MOUs in place where appropriate and being monitored for effectiveness
  • families demonstrating improved confidence in the community and in their relationship with police
  • an agreed number of police members having participated in the program.

Drug and alcohol abuse in a remote regional centre

The problem

The problem addressed by this group concerned drug and alcohol abuse occurring within the community of an identified regional centre located in a remote area, together with associated criminal behaviour and a lack of targeted resources and services.

The strategy

The group saw the first objective for police as achieving a reduction in alcohol and drug-related offences such as family violence, property crime and antisocial behaviour through primary policing responses.

To assist the crime reduction effort and maintain its outcomes (and noting the lack of services in the identified area), the group proposed the establishment of a purpose-built facility for the rehabilitation of illicit drug and substance users. This would be a family-friendly facility which would help families to support users and to address problems within the user's immediate environment that might be contributing to their problem. Creation of the facility would be accompanied by the appointment of a specialist drug and alcohol counsellor.

The group saw the proposed rehabilitation facility as being supported through an education program that would apply a harm minimisation approach in educating the community about the effects of drug and alcohol abuse. One way of promoting and delivering the education campaign could be to door-knock and invite targeted members of the community to attend an education barbecue or similar event.

In developing these responses, the group identified the need to adopt an interagency approach and encourage active and cooperative involvement across a range of agencies. They also saw it as important that rehabilitation efforts be accompanied by the availability of diversionary options and court alternatives that would allow referral to the proposed local drug and alcohol rehabilitation facility and services.

Objectives

Six month objectives:

  • a working program established with all involved parties engaged
  • clients identified and taking part in a trial rehabilitation program
  • the program and response reviewed and refined during this period
  • community feedback from participants and agencies solicited, received and responded to as appropriate.

Twelve month objectives:

  • expansion of the program into other major centres within the LAC
  • review of the program undertaken, with assessment of its suitability for long-term retention
  • continual feedback from stakeholders being received and responded to
  • decrease in drug-related crime.

Strategic information management

The problem

The problem addressed by this group concerned the strategic collection and management of information used to inform an evidence-based response to substance misuse problems. The group identified that current systems are in need of an overhaul to improve the consistency and comparability of information.

The strategy

The group identified the first main objective of the system overhaul as not to increase the current information collection requirements for police, but to collect the data with smarter, improved input processes that would allow provision of a better understanding of broad issues. Another main objective was to use the data more effectively to identify and respond to current and emerging issues.

In achieving these objectives, the group noted the need to analyse current incident forms, software and programs to identify areas for improvement. They saw a need to collate current information systems to reduce fragmentation of information within and between programs. In turn, they saw this as a way towards improving the reporting capabilities of the systems.

The group saw the results of the information systems analysis as the key to progressing improvement of the systems, with the results of the analysis being used at an appropriate corporate level to secure resources and develop a strategic program of redevelopment.

Objectives

Six month objectives:

  • liaison with stakeholders undertaken
  • recommendations and options for systems improvement developed
  • support for recommendations and options sought among corporate stakeholders and sponsors.

Twelve month objectives:

  • change program for systems enhancement and a business case for its implementation developed.
Last updated
3 November 2017