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AIC publications archive - United Nations

Surveys

Crime and justice in Asia (pdf 2.6MB)

A Report on the Third United Nations Survey of Crime Trends, Operations of Criminal Justice Systems and Crime Prevention Strategies, 1980-1986

This report represents a cooperative effort between the United Nations Asia and Far East Institute for the Prevention of Crime and Treatment of Offenders (UNAFEI) and the Australian Institute of Criminology (AIC) in preparation for the Eight United Nations Congress on the Prevention of Crime and Treatment of Offenders, to be held in Havana, Cuba from 27 August to 7 September 1990. While the two week long Congress will deal with a number of issues, this volume contains only one aspect of the activities of the United Nations in the field of criminal justice. This report embodies the results of the analysis of the responses to the Third United Nations Survey of Crime Trends, Operations of Criminal Justice Systems and Crime Prevention Strategies from the Asia and Pacific region.

Compiled and published by UNAFEI and AIC, May 1990

Crime trends in Asia and the Pacific (pdf 1MB)

The Fourth United Nations Survey

This volume represents a cooperative effort between the United Nations Asia and Far East Institute for the Prevention of Crime and Treatment of Offenders (UNAFEI) and the Australian Institute of Criminology (AIC). The report embodies the results of the analysis of the responses to the Fourth United Nations Survey of Crime Trends and Operations of Criminal Justice in Asia and the Pacific region. Wherever available, the volume presents trend data covering all four United Nations Surveys.

Compiled and published by UNAFEI and AIC, February 1995

Events

Human rights in the administration of criminal justiceHuman rights in the administration of criminal justice (pdf 0.29 MB)

Report on the United Nations Course Canberra, Australia, 29 November-17 December 1976: report on the United Nations Course

The fourth United Nations course on Human Rights in the Administration of Criminal Justice took place at the Australian Institute of Criminology, Canberra, Australia, from 29 November to 17 December 1976.

Organised as part of the United Nations Programme of Advisory Services in the Field of Human Rights by the United Nations Division of Human Rights and the Australian Institute of Criminology, at the invitation of the Government of Australia, the specific purpose of this course was to familiarise senior and experienced officials responsible for various aspects of the administration of criminal justice in their respective countries with the relevant legislation and administrative procedures in other countries of the region and the United Nations standards on human rights in the administration of criminal justice.

The course also provided an opportunity for an exchange of views on the law and practices relating to the protection of human rights in criminal procedure in these countries and the techniques for the implementation of international standards.

ISBN 0 642 91587 3
Australian Institute of Criminology, January 1978

Crime prevention planning (pdf 1.4MB)

Proceedings of the United Nations Interregional Training Course on Crime Prevention Planning Sydney, Australia, 10-14 November 1975

The United Nations has been concerned with crime in the context of national development since the 1960s. The focus on planning for crime prevention dates from the latter part of the decade when it became increasingly evident that, contrary to general belief, development, higher standards of living, better education, health and social services, did not of themselves provide an insurance against crime. Indeed, the experience of many developing countries — like that of the developed ones — showed that unplanned and dysfunctional national development was all too often accompanied by rising rates of crime which nullified many of the hard-won gains of economic growth.

ISBN 0 642 92216 0
Australian Institute of Criminology, 1977

Report of the United Nations First Inter-Regional Course on Crime Prevention Planning held in conjunction with the Australian Institute of Criminology (pdf 4.6 MB)

The United Nations was originally induced to consider crime as a planning problem by the pre occupation of the world organisation with the problems of the developing countries during the 1960's -and with the consequential need to consider the relationship between social order and investments in education, health and in general in the economic and social advancement of the poorer countries of Asia, Africa and Latin America.

Australian discussion papersAustralian discussion papers: Seventh United Nations Congress on the Prevention of Crime and Treatment of Offenders (pdf 3.11 MB)

Papers from a UN congress, Milan, 2 6 August-6 September 1985. Topics include:

  1. Development and Crime: Challenges for the Future
  2. Criminal Justice Processes and Perspectives in a Changing World
  3. Crime Victims in Australia
  4. Youth, Crime and Justice
  5. Formulation and Application of United Nations Standards and Norms in Criminal Justice

David Biles, Bill Clifford, Peter Grabosky, Richard W Harding, Peter Loof and Satyanshu Mukherjee
ISBN 0 642 07958 7
Australian Institute of Criminology, January 1985

Policy review

Echoes and hopes (pdf 1.4MB)

The United Nations Committee on Crime Prevention ond Control
This paper has appeared in an abridged form in the United Nations International Review of Criminal Policy No. 34, 1978, but contains more detail than space would allow in that publication. For that reason and its historical relevance the Australian Institute of Criminology is reproducing it as a paper for general information.

Tucked neatly away in the interstices of the massive edifice of councils, agencies, programmes, funds and standing conferences which now constitute the United Nations, is a small committee of fifteen specialists on crime prevention and control which sometimes seems like an aging and handicapped David facing the ever young and increasingly vigorous Goliath of crime. Inheriting, as this Committee does, a tradition of informed and international concern for crime - prevention which pre-dates the United Nations, this inconspicuous group echoes the past efforts of notable and dedicated people to achieve a more positive and co-ordinated form of international action for the prevention of crime. And within this committee there reside still the only real hopes the world may have for effective United Nations leadership in dealing with a crime problem progressively overspilling its national boundaries and mocking so many of our criminal justice systems. Unsung, marginally financed and virtually unnoticed on the turbulent international scene, this reserved (and now constrained) committee strives manfully to place the United Nations in the leadership role so generously accorded to it by other international bodies whilst it was still finding its feet at Lake Success.

William Clifford
ISBN 0 642 91220 3
Australian Institute of Criminology, 1979