Australian Institute of Criminology

Skip to content

Recidivism and desistance: December 2010

A selection of new key reports, books, journal articles and websites. All items are available on interlibrary loan through the JV Barry Library. Please contact your own library for assistance.

Books/reports

Journal articles

  • Chronic offenders : a life-course analysis of marijuana users / Daniel T Ragan and Kevin M Beaver
    Youth and society 42(2) Dec 2010: 174-198
    Summary: The current study employed a life-course framework to examine the factors associated with early onset of marijuana use, with the use of marijuana during adolescence, and with desistance from marijuana use in young adulthood.
  • Effects of South Carolina's sex offender registration and notification policy on adult recidivism / Elizabeth J Letourneau
    Criminal justice policy review 21(4) Dec 2010: 435-458
    Summary: Analysis of secondary data for a sample of 6,064 male offenders convicted of at least one sex crime between 1990 and 2004 revealed that across a mean follow-up of 8.4 years, 490 (8%) offenders had new sex crime charges and 299 (5%) offenders had new sex crime convictions
  • Gender differences in re-offending among psychiatrically examined Swedish offenders / Charlotte Alm
    Criminal behaviour and mental health 20(5) 2010: 323-334
    Summary: This study aims to test for gender differences in re-offending, use of substance abuse treatment, and hospital ER visits among offenders referred for forensic psychiatric assessment in Sweden
  • Measuring sexual offender recidivism / Mary Stathopoulos
    Aware : ACSSA newsletter no. 25 Nov 2010: 20-25
  • Recidivism among young males sentenced to prison and youth custody / Tove Pettersson
    Journal of Scandinavian studies in criminology and crime prevention 11(2) 2010: 151-169
    Summary: The results of this study show that young people sentenced to youth custody (under the the Youth Custody Act 1991-1998 , involving placement of 15-17- year-old serious offenders in a special approved home) reoffend more often than those who were previously sentenced to prison
  • Young serious and vulnerable offenders in the Netherlands : a cohort follow-up study after completion of a PIJ (detention) order / Hjalmar J C van Marle, Inge S Hempel and Nicole M L Buck
    Criminal behaviour and mental health 20(5) 2010: 349-360
    Summary: Examines reoffending and judicial, correctional or psychiatric contacts of juveniles after a PIJ (Placement in an Institution for Juveniles) order and tests the hypothesis that ‘threatened psychological development’ is associated with higher recidivism rates.