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Progress reports

Experiments in restorative policing: a progress report on the Canberra Reintegrative Shaming Experiments (RISE)

These reports describe the progress made in the Reintegrative Shaming Experiments (RISE). The aim of this study is to compare the effects of standard court processing with a diversionary conference for: Drink driving (over .08 blood alcohol content) at any age, Juvenile property offending with personal victims (under 18 years), Juvenile shoplifting offences detected by shop security staff (under 18 years) and Youth violent offences (under 30 years)

July 1999 report

Heather Strang, Geoffrey C Barnes, John Braithwaite and Lawrence W Sherman
Research School of Social Sciences, Australian National University

Abstract

The effects of standard court processing is compared with the effects of a diversionary conference for four kinds of offence categories: drink driving at any age, juvenile property offending with personal victims; juvenile shoplifting offences detected by shop security staff; and youth violent offences. The data analysed confirms that both offenders and victims find diversionary conferences to be fairer than court.

June 1998 report

Lawrence W Sherman, Heather Strang, Geoffrey C Barnes, John Braithwaite, Nova Inkpen and Min-Mee Teh
Research School of Social Sciences, Australian National University

Abstract

This is a report on a project partially funded by the Criminology Research Council. The original title of the project, in the name of John Braithwaite and Lawrence W Sherman, was "Reintegrative shaming of violence, drink driving and property crime: a randomised controlled trial". This report describes the results of the first three years' research conducted under the Canberra Reintegrative Shaming Experiments, which compared the effects of standard court processing with the effects of a diversionary conference for four kinds of cases: drink driving at any age; juvenile property offending with personal victims; juvenile shoplifting offences detected by store security officers; and youth violent crimes. The experiment has found, among other things, that victims whose cases were heard at conference received apologies in most cases, whereas victims whose cases were heard at court received no apologies from offenders; offenders found conferences more stressful than court; most victims said conferences were fairer than court; and offenders said conferences were fairer than court.

July 1997 report

Lawrence W Sherman, John Braithwaite, Heather Strang, Geoffrey C Barnes, Jane Christie-Johnston, Sandra Smith and Nova Inkpen
Research School of Social Sciences, Australian National University

Abstract

This is a report on a project partially funded by the Criminology Research Council. The original title of the project, in the name of John Braithwaite and Lawrence W. Sherman, was "Reintegrative shaming of violence, drink driving and property crime : a randomised controlled trial". In the first two years of the juvenile property crime part of the experiment, the Canberra Reintegrative Shaming Experiments have made substantial progress towards a very strong scientific test of the theory and practice of restorative justice conferences. As of July 4 1997, a total of 156 cases of juvenile property offences involving almost 200 offenders have been randomly assigned to be treated by court or diversionary conference, and the outcomes observed. This report describes the research design and methods, sample characteristics, treatment characteristics, victim perceptions and offender perceptions recorded by the experiment. The research has found, among other things, that almost all conferences attended by victims produced an apology, compensation or both, whereas victims almost never receive compensation or an apology from the court process; conferences make victims less fearful of the offender and of crime in general; offenders feel more ashamed of themselves and their crimes after conferences than court; and offenders are more likely to say they will not reoffend after conference than after court.